New Video Technology That Reveals An Object’s Hidden Properties

September 10th, 2015
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Subtle motion happens around us all the time, including tiny vibrations caused by sound. New technology shows that we can pick up on these vibrations and actually re-create sound and conversations just from a video of a seemingly still object. But now Abe Davis takes it one step further: Watch him demo software that lets anyone interact with these hidden properties, just from a simple video.

 

Computer vision expert Abe Davis pioneers methods to extract audio from silent digital videos, even footage shot on ordinary consumer cameras.

 

Why you should listen

MIT PhD student, computer vision wizard and rap artist Abe Davis has co-created the world’s most improbable audio instrument.  In 2014, Davis and his collaborators debuted the “visual microphone,” an algorithm that samples the sympathetic vibrations of ordinary objects (such as a potato chip bag) from ordinary high-speed video footage and transduces them into intelligible audio tracks.

Davis is also the author of Caperture, a 3D-imaging app designed to create and share 3D images on any compatible smartphone.

What others say

““Imagine someone listening in to your private conversation by filming the bag of chips sitting on the other side of the room. Oddly specific, I know, but researchers at MIT did just that: They’ve created an algorithm that can reconstruct sound (and even intelligible speech) with the tiny vibrations it causes on video.” ” — The Washington Post, August 4, 2014

 

REFERENCE: TED

 

The Nerd’s Guide to Learning Everything Online

August 23rd, 2015
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Some of us learn best in the classroom, and some of us well, we don’t. But we still love to learn — we just need to find the way that works for us. In this charming, personal talk, author John Green shares the community of learning that he found in online video

 

The author of “The Fault in Our Stars” and “Paper Towns,” John Green is a passionate online video maker. John Green is the author of Looking for Alaska, An Abundance of Katherines, Paper Towns, and The Fault in Our Stars. He is also the coauthor, with David Levithan, of Will Grayson, Will Grayson.

 

In 2007, Green and his brother Hank ceased textual communication and began to talk primarily through videoblogs posted to YouTube. The videos spawned a community of people called nerdfighters who fight for intellectualism and to decrease the overall worldwide level of suck. (Decreasing suck takes many forms: Nerdfighters have raised hundreds of thousands of dollars to fight poverty in the developing world; they also planted thousands of trees around the world in May of 2010 to celebrate Hank’s 30th birthday.) Although they have long since resumed textual communication, John and Hank continue to upload two videos a week to their YouTube channel, vlogbrothers. Their videos have been viewed more than 500 million times, and their channel is one of the most popular in the history of online video.

 

MORE ON: http://www.ted.com/talks/john_green_the_nerd_s_guide_to_learning_everything_online

 

Happy Maps Application

January 18th, 2015
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Here’s a new application that would really help improve our life by giving us ideas which part of the city is best place to visit. At Yahoo! Labs in Barcelona, Daniele Quercia and his colleagues imagine new ways to use online maps to improve our lives. Mapping apps help us find the fastest route to where we’re going. But what if we’d rather wander? Researcher Daniele Quercia demos “happy maps” that take into account not only the route you want to take, but how you want to feel along the way.

 

The Wonderful And Terrifying Implications Of Computers

January 11th, 2015
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What happens when we teach a computer how to learn? In this compelling TED talk,Technologist Jeremy Howard shares some surprising new developments in the fast-moving field of deep learning, a technique that can give computers the ability to learn Chinese, or to recognize objects in photos, or to help think through a medical diagnosis. (One deep learning tool, after watching hours of YouTube, taught itself the concept of “cats.”) Get caught up on a field that will change the way the computers around you behave sooner than you probably think. Jeremy Howard imagines how advanced machine learning can improve our lives

 

Jeremy Howard is the CEO of Enlitic, an advanced machine learning company in San Francisco. Previously, he was the president and chief scientist at Kaggle, a community and competition platform of over 200,000 data scientists. Howard is a faculty member at Singularity University, where he teaches data science. He is also a Young Global Leader with the World Economic Forum, and spoke at the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting 2014 on “Jobs for the Machines.”

 

Howard advised Khosla Ventures as their Data Strategist, identifying opportunities for investing in data-driven startups and mentoring portfolio companies to build data-driven businesses. He was the founding CEO of two successful Australian startups, FastMail and Optimal Decisions Group.